Kyoto Imperial Palace and other Imperial Villas in Kyoto

Photo (The Kyoto Imperial Palace)

Photo Description
Okurumayose
Okurumayose
This was the entrance used for official visits by dignitaries who had been granted permission to enter the Palace.
Shodaibunoma
Shodaibunoma
This hall was used as waiting rooms for official visits to the Palace by dignitaries. They were ushered into three different anterooms according to their ranks. The ranking order from the highest to lower was, Tiger’s room, Crane’s room, Cherry blossom’s room.
Tiger’s room
Tiger’s room
Crane’s room
Crane’s room
Cherry blossom’s room
Cherry blossom’s room
Shinmikurumayose
Shinmikurumayose
Shinmikurumayose was built as a new carriage entrance on the occasion of the enthronement ceremony of Emperor Taisho in 1915.
Kenreimon Gate
Kenreimon Gate
Kenreimon Gate, the main gate of the Kyoto Imperial Palace, is used when the Emperor visit to the Palace. It is also used on the occasion of the Emperor’s welcoming of foreign dignitaries.
Shishinden
Shishinden
Shishinden is the most important structure on the Palace grounds and was used for important ceremonies such as enthronement ceremonies. It was built in the Imperial Palace style with high flooring. The roof is in Irimoya (hipped and gabled roof) style, made of hiwada, or layers of cypress bark. Inside there are the Imperial Thrones for the Emperor and the Empress respectively. The one for the Emperor is called “Takamikura”, and the other for the Empress is called “Michodai”. These were constructed in the traditional style for the ceremony of enthronement of Emperor Taisho in 1915. Both Thrones were brought to the Tokyo Imperial Palace for the ceremony of the enthronement of His Majesty Emperor Akihito in 1990.
In front of the structure is a large open courtyard covered with white gravel, is called Dantei (South Courtyard). On either side of its main stairway, are planted trees, a cherry tree called “Sakon-no-sakura” on the left to the east, and a mandarin tree called “Ukon-no-tachibana” on the right to the west.
Seiryoden
Seiryoden
Seiryoden was built in the Shinden Style with lower flooring, and with the roof in Irimoya (hipped and gabled roof) style, made of hiwada, or layers of cypress bark, and was restored in the original style of the Emperor’s residence during the Heian Period. In the center, is an Imperial Throne, called “Michodai”, on which the Emperor reposed himeself. In front of “Michodai”, there are thick tatami mats, called “Hi-no-omashi” which were used for the seat for the Emperor during daytime.
Shunkouden
Shunkouden
The structure was constructed on the occasion of the ceremony of enthronement of Emperor Taisho in 1915, which was held at the Kyoto Imperial Palace.
Kogosyo
Kogosho
Kogosho was built in mixture style of the Shinden style and the Shoin style. It was used as a ceremonial hall as well as on the occasions when the Emperor met Shogun (military rulers of feudal times) and daimyo (feudal lords). On the night of December 9th in 1867, following the Declaration of the Restoration of Imperial Rules, the Kogosho Conference was held here. The present structure was reconstructed in 1958.
Oikeniwa Garden
Oikeniwa Garden
Oikeniwa Garden features a spacious pond with its strolling pathway around the pond. The front shoreline called Suhama is covered with pebbled stones and a path of large unevenly shaped stepping stones leads down to the water’s edge. Various elements, Keyakibashi Bridge, arrangements of stones, and varied grasses and trees planted on the shore, offer the variety of scenery of the garden.
Ogakumonjo
Ogakumonjo
Ogakumonjo was built in the Shoin Style with the roof in Irimoya (hipped and gabled roof) style, made of hiwada, or layers of cypress bark. This was the place where the academic events were held such as Waka poetry recitals, other academic lectures, and having meetings with vassals.
Gonaitei Garden
Gonaitei Garden
Gonaitei Garden (Inner Garden) is the Emperor’s private garden which was exquisitely designed with the meandering stream spanned by earthen and wooden bridges and a tea pavilion “Kintei” situated at the back of the garden.
Otsunegoten
Otsunegoten
Otsunegoten is the largest structure on the Palace grounds was built in the Shoin style with the roof in Irimoya (hipped and gabled roof) style, made of hiwada, or layers of cypress bark and was used as the Emperor’s private residence after the 16th century, in place of the Seiryoden.
The Jodan-no-ma (Upper room), Chudan-no-ma (Middle room), Kadan-no-ma (Lower room) and Kenji-no-ma (Treasure room)of the Otsunegoten
The Jodan-no-ma (Upper room), Chudan-no-ma (Middle room), Kadan-no-ma (Lower room) and Kenji-no-ma (Treasure room) of the Otsunegoten
Jodan-no-ma, Chudan-no-ma and Kadan-no-ma were used on the occasion when the Emperors met their private guests. Kenji-no-ma was used as the treasure room to store the Imperial Regalia.
Kogogu Tsunegoten
Kogogu Tsunegoten
This structure was constructed as the private residence for empresses.
Higyosha
Higyosha
The Nyogojudai ceremony was held in the Higyosha, and this structure was restored in the original style of the Nyogo’s residence of the Heian Period. This building is also known as Fujitsubo, named after wisteria flowers (fuji) planted in the inner courtyard.
Wakamiya / Himemiya Goten
Wakamiya / Himemiya Goten
These structures were the palaces for princes and princesses, where the Emperor Meiji resided at one time.